Making magick at Ritual

Unassumingly tucked away in a small commercial plaza off Rt. 6A lies in wait for a hidden gem- unlikely to be found by accident, and likely just what you didn’t know what you are looking for until you find it. That was true even for owner Holly Lemieux, when she established Ritual in May of 2021 after selling her popular boutique in Hyannis in pursuit of new endeavors. Having planned to take some time off to regroup in between projects, the universe- as it sometimes does- delivered just the right set of circumstances, and within a month Ritual found its home in Yarmouth Port.

Natural wooden shelving displays a wide variety of USDA, FDA-certified organic, and ethically wildcrafted dried herbs.

A string of bells jingle as two women enter the shop, and Holly is summoned from the firepit out back where she had been chatting with Meghan Hamilton, a Tarot reader and medium who does readings and Spell Consultations by appointment and walk-in on Fridays. Holly greets and invites her guests to browse to their spirit’s content through the ethereal collection of pewter and ceramic bowls brimming with skeleton keys and polished rings of hematite. Books of spellcasting and potions, meditations, and prayers span the rooms, intermingled with a wide array of oracle cards and idols, incense cones, and bottled bones. A full corner of the shop hosts shelves upon shelves of glass bottles of various dried resins and dried herbs, including some that are harder to source, and used for magical purposes- like Blue, White, Red, and Sacred Lotus.

“We are open to all practices and paths. We try to have material, books or ephemera to everybody who walks through our door.” -Holly, Owner of Ritual

Perhaps surprisingly, is Holly’s down to Earth approach to the otherworldy. “I like being able to change people’s conception of things,” describing how people unfamiliar with metaphysical things can perceive them as scary. “Either way we are all making meatloaf. Just using a different recipe,” she explains, and as such, she advises her patrons to let their individual intuition be the guide for which crystal, deck, or talisman to select. One woman approaches the counter with a handblown glass wand, an opaline bracelet, and a shiny piece of black tourmaline. Her friend, unable to choose between her narrowed-down selection of beaded gemstone bracelets, decides to go with all four; black onyx, rainbow fluorite, clear and rose quartz, and a bag of loose white sage. They talk amongst each other about scheduling a card reading as they exit the way they came in, past the one item in the store that is not for sale. A huge amethyst geode made to resemble a shark with its large googly eyes, aptly named Bruce.

Ritual proudly offers handmade and artisan products crafted by local artists and practitioners on Cape Cod and nearby communities and is hosting its 2nd annual Salty Witches Samhain Market on October 30th.

Other upcoming events can be found on the website, including Psychic Readings with Kris on Tuesdays, Tarot, and Oracle on Wednesdays, and Energy Healing on Thursdays with Molly. Register for Conscious Creation, a 4 Week Intuitive Writing Workshop beginning November 4th. Jerry Marchand will share his knowledge of rare crystal and mineral specimens on November 12th, with 5% of the proceeds of his sales to benefit the Dakin Humane Society. Be sure to check the website and Facebook for updates and new events, including big news at the end of December!

Ritual is located at 939 Rt. 6A, Unit B
Yarmouth Port, MA 02675.
(774) 994-8358
ritualcapecod@gmail.com
ritualcapecod.com

This blog is funded through the Town of Yarmouth’s Tourism Revenue Preservation Fund.

Photo credit: Britt Skinner

(Britt Skinner is a freelance writer.)

Thacher Hall, A Hidden Gem in Plain Sight

Thacher Hall

On Old King’s Highway among centennial Yarmouthport buildings such as the Edward Gorey House and Benjamin Thacher Gorham House, sits what architect Sarah Jane Porter calls “the most significant historic public structure of its period on Cape Cod.” Boston architect Samuel Thayer designed the building formerly known as the Church of the New Jerusalem in 1870, constructed by John Hinckley, with towering gothic arches, and stained glass windows. The church was originally the spiritual home to Swedenborgian Christians, (a popular denomination of its time), and was congregated for about a hundred years until the number of parishioners dwindled too low to maintain the edifice, and it fell into devastating disrepair.

In 1998 when Cape Cod community members, who wanted to see the property reinvented as a community center, organized The Yarmouth New Church Preservation Foundation, a local board of volunteer directors purchased the former church building for $1 and began the mission to breathe new life into the old bones of the building and utilize it as a community center. Sorely needed renovations continue to be primarily funded by donations, ticket sales, and the yearly contributions of the Friends of the Yarmouth New Church Preservation Foundation. Since then, the foundation has brought the building up to current fire codes and handicapped accessibility, improved water, and electrical services, and updated the sound and lighting systems.

The carefully renovated belltower and belfry preserve the ethereal beauty and soul of the place, and the restored original stained-glass windows and frescoed walls overlook the original tracker pipe organ. Adding to its attention-drawing uniquely exquisite character are pews crafted of American Chestnut, a hardwood that became functionally extinct after a catastrophic blight in the early 20th century. 

However, even with all the restorations, a new roof, and a fresh coat of paint to broadcast its readiness to be a part of the community as a whole, the building is still frequently mistaken for a church. A common misconception that was perpetuated by the old name, The New Church. On June 26, 2022, after plans were temporarily halted by the COVID19 pandemic, the building was rebranded as Thacher Hall at a dedication ceremony by the foundation and members of the Cape Cod community.

Live music with Blu Central & Greg Hischak

Yarmouth resident and foundation Event Manager, Victoria Krukowski, explains that while the beautiful building’s allure contains the staples, and ambiance of a gorgeous old church, it no longer holds any religious affiliations, and is the perfect venue for local artists to display galleries of their work in a place that according to her feels like taking a step back in time. Having a career background as a musician with the symphony orchestra, she appreciates how the rustic space carries soulful acoustics, and she deeply admires the historical artifacts and quirky intricacies that Thacher Hall offers a remarkable choice for private and community events.

Previous events have included Open Mic Nights, weddings, memorial services, the Cape Cod Chamber Orchestra, Haunted Octobers, and Christmas Strolls. Since 2020 it has been used as a community art center. Planned Events and availability can be found on the website, and they can be reached by phone at 508-744-7368, and by Email at events@yarmouthportcommon.org.

Thacher Hall invites you to attend a Historic 1870 Organ Demonstration and Concert at 2 pm on Sunday, August 7th, 2022, where you can learn the history of the organ, see how the organ is built, and hear it played by Dr. Mark Lawlor, of the American Guild of Organists of Cape Cod and the islands. This family-friendly event is free to attend.

Thacher Hall is located at 266 Route 6A (Main Street), in Yarmouthport. 

This blog is funded through the Town of Yarmouth’s Tourism Revenue Preservation Fund.

Photo credits: Britt Skinner and William DeSousa-Mauk

(Britt Skinner is a freelance writer.)

Yarmouth in the Revolution

In order to recognize the 250th anniversary of the events leading up to, and of the American Revolution, the Revolutionary War Commemorative Committee is researching events and filling gaps in our knowledge with an emphasis on primary sources, and the correcting of myths, embellishments, and unsupported generalities passed down over the years. We hope readers will be inspired to share with us family lore, diaries, letters, stories, or documents about the Revolution in “old” Yarmouth.

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Summer is in full swing on Cape Cod

The beaches are bustling with locals and visitors alike, and the ice cream shops can hardly scoop fast enough to cool off the queue of sun-kissed patrons in between rounds of mini-golf. But it’s not summer on the Cape, according to die-hard sports fans across the nation, without the excitement of the famously riveting Cape Cod Baseball League games played by the most up-and-coming college players with big dreams of making it to the Major Leagues. 

Red Wilson Field, named in 1981 for legendary Yarmouth coach, manager, and player Merrill “Red” Wilson, located at D-Y High School, has been home to the Red Sox since 1973. However, it would be another 4 years until the team would be expanded to include the town of Dennis. Over 40 years later, the 2022 Yarmouth-Dennis Red-Sox are off to a great start, currently holding first place in the East Division. The team recently had seven players selected onto the Easts All Star Roster, including two starting fielders, two reserve fielders, and three pitchers.

The 24th year of coaching for Scott “Pick” Pickler has seen him break the record for all-time managerial wins in the Cape Cod Baseball League. On June 25th after a 5 to 3 win against the Cotuit Kettleers, Pick earned his 540th win, all with the Y-D Red Sox, earning cheers and accolades from the team and fans.  “He is a great coach, a great ambassador for the community, and a great leader of these young men. We couldn’t be prouder of all his accomplishments,” boasts Shane Skinner, Interim President of the Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox, who was there for the record-breaking game, and had the honor of presenting Pick with a plaque to commemorate the win. Pick and his team, in doing their part to give back to the community, have been involved by volunteering their time with many local organizations, including Cape Cod Five, Ryan’s Family Amusements, the Red Jacket, and the Dennis Senior Center.

Being involved with the Cape Cod Baseball League has been a blessing for Shane. “I’ve always had a passion for sports,” he explains, “and being able to combine that passion with my experience of running businesses is like a dream come true.”  Shane can be found at each and every home game making sure things run smoothly and overseeing all business operations. With the help of ten dedicated baseball fans on the Board of Directors, over 30 Volunteer Interns, and over a dozen Community Volunteers, the Yarmouth-Dennis Red-Sox enthusiastically hosts a fun Game Day experience for families and fans of all ages. At a recent game, a small group of young kids stood up in the balcony next to the press box and sang “Take Me Out To The Ball Game,” a new addition to the festivities this year. “I’d say most nights it’s about 60% giggles and 40% singing which is just great,” Shane laughs. “The kids love it.” Singers have come from all over the state, and some from right here on Cape to sing the National Anthem before games, and set the scene for a family-fun night of good ol’ American baseball.

Upwards of two thousand fans per game don Red-Sox gear, lining the bleachers and dotting the outskirts of the field with beach chairs, for their chance to see superstars in the making. The merchandise booth offers trinkets, hats, and attire for all ages to support their favorite team. Families who come early can observe batting practice and then partake in some of the in-game events. This week on Tuesday 7/19 is Pokémon at the Park Night, hosted by the Cape Cod Toy Chest, and patrons can enter with Pixy 103 to win a baseball autographed by the team. On Thursday 7/21, the players will be available after the game to greet fans and sign baseballs, souvenir bats, and other items. Concessions offer a satisfying assortment of ball-game favorites like sausage subs, hot dogs, burgers, pretzels, and cold drinks. They sell out of hot delicious Paradise Pizza by the 5th inning, so be sure to order early! The 50/50 shed will have raffle tickets on sale, in addition to candy and drinks. The raffle is held at the bottom of the 7th inning. The Y-D Red Sox, and the entire Cape Cod Baseball League, strive to maintain a family-friendly atmosphere. Admission and parking are free, but tax-deductible donations are always welcome. As a not-for-profit establishment, donations keep the team equipped and outfitted, and able to put on a great season year after year.

Baseball Clinics For Kids

Youth Baseball Clinics for ages 5-16 run Monday-Friday from 9-11:30 am and are run by Coach Pickler, the Assistant Coaches, and some of the players. “It’s just a great opportunity. These kids get to go out there and play some baseball and learn some skills from these top players and have a great time each week. The weekly clinics end with a kids vs. family baseball game. I just played against my two sons, and we couldn’t have had a better time.” The last week for the 2022 clinics begins Monday 7/25. Registration can be completed online or at the field.

There’s a saying amongst the team:

When on Cape Cod you must:

  1. Go the beach
  2. Eat a lobstah
  3. Go to a Y-D baseball game

We hope to see you there!

For more info about the Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox visit the website, or find them on Instagram and Facebook.

This blog is funded through the Town of Yarmouth’s Tourism Revenue Preservation Fund.

Photo credit: Y-D Red Sox Intern Sadie Parker

(Britt Skinner is a freelance writer.)

Things to Do with Kids in Yarmouth

You planned a vacation in Yarmouth with the whole family, but other than spending time on the beach, you’re not sure how you’re going to pass the time. Your kids want to stay plugged into their devices. You want to focus on family time and creating memories to last a lifetime.

Check out our list of fun things to do when you are visiting Yarmouth and Cape Cod with children of any age.

Family of mother and kids enjoying a ride on a public ferry at sunset

Explore the area by land or sea

With water everywhere, you can enjoy a nautical adventure with a sightseeing cruise or a ferry to one of the nearby islands. Or take a drive through quaint towns and villages–an opportunity to encourage younger ones to take a nap while you soak in some of the picturesque views.

Go whale watching

Seeing whales in their natural habitat is awe-inspiring. While there’s no guarantee of how many whales you will see on your excursion, the boat ride alone will take a significant part of your day. Whale-watching trips are generally close to four hours, and you’ll want to leave yourself enough time beforehand for boarding.

Kid fishing

Reel them in with some fishing

The variety of water bodies in Yarmouth provides a wide range of fishing options. Search out a lake, pond, or riverside fishing hole, or take to the high seas for a day of trawling on the open waters. Even if you prefer catch-and-release, a day spent fishing teaches patience and persistence. Plus, it can give you time to slow down, relax, and talk with your kids about anything, everything, or nothing at all.

Get out

Burn off some energy with outdoor adventures. Take in the scenery by biking, kayaking, sailing, or taking a trek on the dunes. Let the kids take the wheel on a go-kart track or cool off at the Wicked Waves Water Park.

Play a round or two

On Cape Cod, you’ll find expertly designed golf courses of all sizes. Not only can you take the whole family mini-golfing on a putt-putt course, but you can play 9 or 18 holes with your older children on links with incredible scenic views.

Step back in time

Explore Yarmouth’s rich history and culture at a variety of museums and historical centers. Visit the homes of notable literary figures, check out sites that recreate the region’s legends and lore, and give your children an education without their even realizing it.

Indulge in a sweet treat

Two ice cream cones

Regardless of how else you spend the day taking a break for ice cream makes everything a little sweeter. Treat the kids to an afternoon snack or delicious dessert. Or, for teens who sleep in all morning, surprise them with ice cream for a late breakfast. It’s sure to create memories they’ll hang on to for years to come.

Cheer for the home team

No tickets are needed to turn out to root for your favorite Y-D Red Sox players. Bring the whole family to watch some of the best collegiate players take to the diamond. You never know when you’ll see a future phenom, like former Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox pitcher Chris Sale.

Spend time on the beach

Yes, this one is obvious, but it’s an essential part of a stay in Yarmouth. There are many beautiful beaches with options on both Cape Cod Bay and Nantucket Sound sides. Not only can you go swimming, but you can walk or play along the water’s edge or just listen to the water going in and out. Teaching your children how to unplug and just live in the moment is an essential lesson for the years ahead.

Kids grow from toddlers to teens all too fast. But with our suggestion of ways to entertain your family on the Cape, you’re sure to find plenty of reasons to keep coming back year after year.

This blog is funded through the Town of Yarmouth’s Tourism Revenue Preservation Fund.

Another Cape Cod Spring Has Arrived

Finally. At long last the lingering, biting Cape Cod winter is breaking into Spring. The final crests of snow have melted away to reveal the stretch and yawn of the first crocuses, and the impatient shoots of eager daffodils. The Spring Peepers can be heard in the bogs and marshes, the Ospreys have returned to their platforms to nest, and the local gardeners have thumbs that are growing greener with each passing mild day. So many of us are itching to get outside and rake the leaves, amend our soils, and stock our greenhouses. Novice gardeners or those who are new to Cape have a lot of things to consider, especially with botanical projects that can take months of love and attention to detail before the gorgeous and often delicious payoff. Seasoned growers will advise utilizing native plants whenever possible, that are cold hardy and appreciative of our sandy soil and local pollinators, but even experienced gardeners will benefit from up-to-date information as standards and recommendations develop over time. C.L. Fornari is a gardening guru residing in Sandwich, co-host of Plantrama podcast, and author of several books about gardening on Cape Cod, and when asked to share her expertise she was happy to oblige.

When Fornari moved to the Cape in 1993 she was unable to find a book about Cape Cod gardening, so she wrote it herself. She has since written several books about gardening on Cape Cod, with her book Sand and Soil being the most recent. She goes on to explain how local gardening standards have changed significantly in the past 30ish years since her first Cape gardening book was published in the mid-90s. “The plants that we thought were great at that time have proven to be not so desirable. Some plants that were commonly sold at that time are now “banned in Boston” (and the rest of the Commonwealth) because they are invasive. And there are new pests, diseases, and plants that people should know about. It was for those reasons and more that I wrote a new book about Cape Cod gardening and didn’t just update the original one.”

Leave the Leaves?

While we may be ready to banish the leaf piles from our flowerbeds, Mother Nature has other ideas. The leaves that have been insulating our lawns and Spring bulbs all winter have also been providing shelter for overwintering bees and butterflies, and although the sight of tulip leaves peeking through the crisp remnants of fall is enough to have us reaching for the rake, we of course also want to be mindful of the sleepy pollinators who are about to once again embark upon the priceless work that our very existence depends on. What are we to do?

Fornari answers, “This question is a great example of how standard landscaping practices have changed in the past ten years, and how we’re all called to be more flexible in our thinking.  Back in the day, we did a “fall clean up” and a “spring cleanup.” All the leaves were removed in those clean-sweeps, and usually (horrors!) removed from the property. Now we know better about the value of leaves for plants and pollinators. But it’s not either or.” She tells us that although you’ll see posts talking about waiting to clean up a garden until temperatures are above 50, there is no hard science behind that number. “Homeowners need to know that it’s not all or nothing. You can remove some leaves anytime, take others out in May, and leave some in place as Nature intended.”

When it comes to amending soil, Fornari contends that we should never assume that our soil needs improving, pointing out the thousands of mosses, trees, and all the plants in between that thrive comfortably without help. She recommends grouping plants that we know have soil requirements, (using Hydrangeas as an example), in areas where we can amend the soil from the top-down, adding “Soil ‘improvement’ practices have changed in the past twenty years. We know now that tilling, digging, and replacing native soils should be avoided whenever possible.”

Gardens this time of year tend to be limited to early perennials including favorites like basket-of-gold and bleeding heart, so Fornari suggests adding pansies to your space for a burst of color and a touch of cheer.

The Green Spot Opens for Business

Pansies are what Jim Behnke, owner of The Green Spot Garden Center, says are his biggest seller this time of year. The 4 decades-old family-owned garden center opened for the season on March 21st and has a nursery and 2 greenhouses on-site in addition to a full line of annuals, perennials, roses, shrubs, and trees. Jim looks forward to seeing early patrons popping in for seed starters and specialty soils, and to check out the annual specials of things like Miracle Grow and Hollytone. They have onions and garlic in stock, followed soon by cold-loving plants like lettuce and broccoli, and a few weeks after that, potato seedlings. For those of us rushing to get started on our veggie gardens, Jim warns not so fast. “The biggest thing you have to pay attention to is weather,” he cautions, mentioning that it won’t be time to get many crops in the ground until up to May and June in some cases. “Sometimes you gotta pinch yourself and remember to be patient.”

The Green Spot is located at 1085 Route 28 in South Yarmouth and is open seven days a week from 9-5.

This blog is funded through the Town of Yarmouth’s Tourism Revenue Preservation Fund.

(Britt Skinner is a freelance writer.)

When bush comes to shrub, try growing Cape-friendly blueberries

Where can you find a winter-hardy shrub that thrives in Yarmouth’s sandy soil; turns brilliant red in autumn; provides food for native songbirds; and fills the freezer with antioxidant-rich power food?

When bush comes to shrub, it’s hard to beat the humble blueberry.

Now that the spring gardening season has arrived on Cape Cod, it’s time to plant trees and shrubs, as well as vegetables and flowering plants. It’s also the best time to plant high-bush blueberries, allowing a full growing season during their first year in the landscape.

A lot of people are really looking to grow their own foods today, said Rose Grevelis, senior nursery associate at Agway of Cape Cod in South Dennis. Blueberries fit perfectly into that plan.

As they mature, high-bush blueberries provide an attractive border or screen for objects in the home landscape. And when bushes mature, they reward growers with a harvest of sweet-tart berries. Unlike evergreens, blueberries do lose their leaves in winter, but before that happens, the foliage turns a brilliant crimson.

Agway sells an assortment of blueberry bushes, Grevelis said, starting with one-gallon potted plants that will take about three years to begin producing a respectable harvest. To ensure their health and future productivity, she advises the following steps:

  • Choose several blueberry varieties for good pollination and berry production. If you have the space, grow two or more varieties of early, mid-season and late-fruiting blueberries. That way you can stretch your berry-picking time from late June through mid-September. Earliblue, Ivanhoe, Patriot and Blue Ray are early varieties; Berkeley, Bluecrop, Pioneer and Atlantic are mid-season varieties; and Jersey, Coville, Lateblue and Elliot are late-fruiting choices. Jersey is an especially popular choice for Cape Cod growers, Grevelis said.
  • Test your soil’s pH before planting. Blueberries love acidic soil – even more acidic than the natural conditions on Cape Cod. Chances are you’ll need to add some sulfur to raise the soil’s acidity (lowering the pH to between 4.1 and 5.0 on a scale where 7.0 is neutral). Don’t know how to test your soil’s pH? No worries. Agway of Cape Cod offers free pH testing.
  • Blueberries will tolerate some shade, but they grow strongest and provide the most fruit when grown in full sun (at least six hours per day).
  • Blueberries love water, but don’t perform well when their roots are soggy, so plant them in well-draining soil. That’s an easy task when you live on Cape Cod, where the sandy soil drains almost instantly. To retain some water and nutrients, dig your hole the same depth as the pot, but double or triple its width. Then add plenty of organic compost and mix it into the surrounding soil.
  • Space blueberry bushes at least 4-5 feet apart. This will allow stronger root growth as well as good air circulation, which helps prevent diseases. It will also leave you ample space to pick the berries once bushes mature.
  • One pest that sometimes attacks Cape Cod blueberry bushes is the winter moth, which varies in population from year to year. If you see a lot of beige, night-flying moths on warm nights between Thanksgiving and Christmas, chances are the tiny larvae will eat the blossoms and leaf-buds of your blueberry bushes come spring. Solution: Spray the bare branches, twigs and bark with a dormant oil in late winter. It will smother the eggs.
  • To protect your blueberry crop from catbirds, robins and other feathered friends, cover the bushes with netting. A tall cage made from lightweight deer fencing with steel electrical conduit for posts is a low-cost option. Drape plastic bird netting over the top during fruiting season and remove the top in winter.

Agway of Cape Cod will be one of the garden and landscaping companies participating in the spring Home, Garden and Lifestyle Show, set for May 16-17 at the Barnstable High School field house. Find more information on the show at the Hyannis Rotary Club website.

(Yarmouth Chamber of Commerce blogger Andy Tomolonis is a multimedia producer, award-winning journalist and author of Organic Hobby Farming: A Practical Guide to Earth-Friendly Farming in Any Space.)

Top 5 Best of Yarmouth: Walks & Hikes

Bud Carter Conservation area

Gray's Beach

Gray’s Beach

One of the best ways to appreciate the nature and history of Yarmouth is enjoying a walk down one of our historical lanes or hiking on one of our nature trails. On foot, you have the time to enjoy the natural beauty of the seashore, marshes, botanical trails, or the 18th and 19th century architecture of the sea captain’s homes and the churches that are linked to the founding of the town.

No matter the time of year, we all want to get outside and enjoy Cape Cod’s salty air with a nice walk. Lucky for us, Yarmouth has many beautiful hiking paths on Conservation Land, sidewalks for strolling, and a great stretch of shoreline for those seaside walks. Here are our favorites!

By Cindi Griffin, Cape Interactive Media

Botanical Trails

Botanical Trails

#1 The Botanical Trails at the Historical Society of Yarmouth

A favorite walk among residents of Yarmouth is hidden just behind the Yarmouth Port Post Office off of Route 6A. The Botanical Trails, or Nature Trails, of the Historical Society of Yarmouth, boast a nature lovers dream of plants and tree specimens that add a bit of variety to a traditional walk through the woods. If you’re a first timer, this is one walk worth taking with the Trail Map and Nature Trail Guide so you can see where you are, and know when to stop and look for notable flora, fauna and geological points of interest. You can pick up the guide at the gatehouse at the beginning of the trail and, no matter the time of year, it’s a good idea to apply your bug repellent. The trail winds around Miller Pond, one of Cape Cod’s many kettle ponds formed by glacial ice deposits, and has some variety of terrain that is great for sure-footed adults and older children.

At the end of the trail you’ll see the lovely little Kelley Chapel, a non-denominational chapel built in 1873 and donated to the Historical Society in 1960 when it was moved from the Georgetown area along Bass River in South Yarmouth. Kelley Chapel is available mid-spring through December for special events and weddings.

Gray's Beach

Gray’s Beach

#2 The Callery-Darling Conservation Trails at Gray’s Beach

The Callery-Darling trails that wind through the marshes of Yarmouth Port, have some of the best payoffs of any hike in the Mid-Cape area. Follow the trail that takes you through the Center Street Marshes (entrance located on west side of the road), and you’ll find a whimsical old fashioned swing, and a spectacular view of Barnstable’s Sandy Neck. On the east side, the trails wind through the Chase Garden Creek Marsh, with views overlooking the Grey’s Beach and Chapin Memorial Beach in Dennis. MAP/GUIDE.

Captains' Mile

Captains’ Mile

#3 The Captains’ Mile

Getting to know the historical significance of the Old King’s Highway and it’s early residents, with a nice stroll along the “Captains’ Mile” on Route 6A in Yarmouth Port. MAP/GUIDEThe black and gold relief carved plaques featuring a schooner ship signify each captain’s home on the Captains’ Mile, which are now mainly private residents. To see inside, visit the Captain Bangs Hallet House at 11 Strawberry Lane on the north side of the village green. If you’re into supernatural history, you can also download the Ghosts, Myths and Legends guide to accompany you on your tour. GUIDE.

#4 Old South Yarmouth and Bass River Village Walking Tour

On the south side of Yarmouth is another historical walking tour through Bass River Village. On top of the Greek Revival architecture we see so prominently on the north side, there are homes with charming Victorian and Italianate flourishes and a history in keeping with Yarmouth’s seafaring founders. MAP/GUIDE.

Crab Creek

Crab Creek

 

Bass River Beach

Bass River Beach

#5 South Shore Drive

One of the longest stretches of shoreline (about 1.3 miles) in Yarmouth runs from Bass River Beach (aka “Smuggler’s Beach”) along South Shore Drive to Thacher Park Beach. Lined with oceanfront hotels, beach cottages, private residences, public and resident-only beaches, South Shore Drive also has a sidewalk that’s perfect for walkers and joggers who want to take in the fresh ocean breeze. Those interested in a longer walk, can park at the Bass River Beach lot (see in season fees) and walk the beach, with several options to double-back and return up to the paved sidewalk via South Middle Beach, Parker’s River Beach, Seaview Beach or Thacher Park Beach, which is quite convenient since the beautiful soft sand of the Nantucket Sound beaches are a little more difficult for running and walking than you might expect. If you want an even longer walk, keep following the sidewalk past Bass River Beach down South Street, which also connects to Old Main Street. Along the way, you’ll enjoy seeing many beautiful homes, gardens and points of interest. If you work up an appetite, there’s a new gelateria, Caffe Gelato Bertini, next to the Great Island Bakery on South Street, and the Skipper Restaurant and Chowder House, which also serves ice cream, on South Shore Drive.

Things to do in Yarmouth, Cape Cod

There are plenty of “THINGS TO DO” to keep you busy here in Yarmouth and on Cape Cod! Click on the images below for a complete listing.

FREE ACTIVITIES in Yarmouth

From hiking trails to visiting cranberry bogs, Yarmouth has a variety of free activities to do. Please browse our list of free activities in Yarmouth below.Free Activities in Yarmouth, MA

MUST-SEE PLACES in Yarmouth Cape Cod

Yarmouth boasts many historic and scenic attractions. Checkout our list of must-see places below:

Must See Places List in Yarmouth, MA

FAMILY ACTIVITIES in Yarmouth Cape Cod

Are you looking for things to do in Cape Cod with your family? Yarmouth offers many fun activities for you and your loved ones to enjoy! Please browse our list below for details or also see our list of things to do with kids on Cape Cod

Family Activities List in Yarmouth, MA

RAINY DAY ACTIVITIES ON CAPE COD

When Mother Nature disrupts your beach plans, having a rainy-day activity in your back pocket is a must! Check out our list below for fun things to do in Yarmouth when it rains.

Rainy Day Activities List in Yarmouth, MA